Sunday, November 19,  2017

Life

Living the Change: Confusion vs. Panic

BY Yusra Badr

We came. We revolted. We won! Now, we panic!


I am often asked how I feel about current events in our country by friends, family and colleagues, and my usual response is that I am optimistic, but I refrain from going into details. I listen, I smile and I just let the conversation die. The reason behind my silence is complete and utter confusion.


Honestly, my mind is overloaded.

In these turbulent times, where we live days on end with nothing significant going on, then find ourselves overwhelmed by events in a mere few hours, I can’t help but feel confused. Questions crowd my head of which too many answers are offered. Facts no longer exist. Opinions and theories are flying left and right. 


Where is the truth?

When reliable resources make conflicting statements, who do you believe? When every theory you hear makes perfect sense, which do you consider? When all you can base your predictions of the future on is the corruption of the past, how can you have rational expectations?


The magnitude of this revolution is beyond not only our imagination, but that of the entireWhen reliable resources make conflicting statements, who do you believe? When every theory you hear makes perfect sense, which do you consider? When all you can base your predictions of the future on is the corruption of the past, how can you have rational expectations? world. When we first started, we had no idea where we were going, and we never expected to be where we are today, so it is only natural that we now stand bewildered amidst it all. 


So, in these turbulent times, it seems to me like the only sane state of mind to be in is confusion.


Having said that, it is vital to also say that there is a thin line that separates confusion from panic. Being confused is alright, as long as this confusion does not give you an adrenaline rush and lead to irrational decisions, judgments or frenzy over what to do next or what to believe in.


It is safe to say that Egypt, in its entirety, is confused right now, starting with the Supreme Council of Armed Forces and the Prime Minister, and ending with the simplest Egyptians on the streets of distant governorates across the country. So, since we’re all confused, it is also safe to say that it’s alright to be confused. An entire nation will not unanimously agree on one thing unless it was right. Right?


Establishing that as a basis is important. We must believe that it is ok to be confused. We must acknowledge that we are all new to this “freedom” thing and that we are clueless over what to do, feel, contribute or believe. We are all like babies still learning how to walk. We need to take baby steps towards understanding the true meaning of democracy so that we can live it and practice it in our daily lives, and not only on a political front.


Confused, and without panic, we begin to arm ourselves with knowledge and awareness. OneConfusion, without panic, creates healthy curiosity and, thus, awareness and knowledge. 
The chaos will subside.
 of the good things that our revolution has resulted in is the surplus of data that is now available simply everywhere. The Internet is literally being bombarded by raw material for study, and television talk shows and news channels are doing an excellent job as they finally experience a substantial amount of freedom of speech and expression. If we are to read, listen and discuss all this raw data that is now in excess all around us, I believe we will be able to properly weigh the pros and cons of each theory in a manner that makes sense to each one of us individually.


It’s also remarkable how discussion panels, forums and lectures are now being held regularly all over our cities. In listening to those who are slightly less confused than we are, there is a chance that we will see the light at the end of the tunnel. It is crucial, though, to remember the importance of forming our own opinions. It’s easy to be tempted into joining a specific ideology or even a political party just because some of its members are respectable or admirable. How much of this ideology do you actually like? What made you think that this or that political party is good enough to join or support?


Sure, we may all be confused today, but we most certainly won’t be in the near future. Just like the 18 days of the revolution passed, with all their confusion and turbulence, this too shall pass. The picture unveils its features with every passing day, new events happen every week and icons in politics, economics and reform enlighten us with something new all the time. 


Watch, listen and digest. 

We may even be surprised to find out that all the different movements, theories and parties out there aim for the same thing. In-depth analysis of each can actually present a unified front with different approaches to the same aim. We all want a better Egypt, we’re only disagreeing on how to get there.


Confusion, without panic, creates healthy curiosity and, thus, awareness and knowledge. 

 

The chaos will subside. 

The crowds and loud voices will settle, and eventually, only the genuine will remain.

We are living the change. 

 

 Yusra Badr is a dedicated writer, copywriter, editor and translator.  Her blog can be found at http://www.budzaya.com



READ MORE BY:  Yusra Badr

 

Share

 

 

Rants

There’s No Grey in Our Flag

 “In the land of all black and all white, shouting grey is blasphemy;” and there are 80 million shades of grey in Egypt. Continue Reading

View More

EDITORIAL

Editorial – The Nile

It’s simple really, if we don’t save the Nile, everything else we are debating, discussing, arguing about will be irrelevant. Continue Reading

An open letter to Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei

I have the greatest respect and admiration for you. We can never forget that it was your courage and foresight that called for change and a transition...  Continue Reading

View More

Mish Fahem?

Mish Fahem?

Mish Fahems are stand-alone cartoons interspersed throughout the paper that humorously raise a specific question or point out an apparent contradiction,...  Continue Reading

View More

Polls

Removing the word "civil" from the Constitution will result in
 A military state
 A theocratic (religious) state
 A civil state
 Don''t care
Do you support holding football matches with fans attending?
 Yes
 No
 Don''t care